Dementia Friendly Communities

Been just as busy February as January.   Last week I spoke at the launch of Blackhall and Hesleden Dementia Friendly Community.   Since our own launch of Dementia Friendly Seaham things have been moving along nicely.   But boy, these things take work, and time and commitment.

What does it mean to launch a dementia friendly community?   Look around your own community and see if there are any stickers on shop doors that indicate that staff have taken part in Dementia Friends Sessions.  How many do you see?   The large supermarket, does that have a dementia/disability friendly slow checkout lane?   What about cafes?  Your local library, council offices, your GP Surgeries?  What sort of groups are available; support for carers, peer groups, and activities, are in your local area?  Where do you think you would find out information telling you what there is?

Out of all of the members of our working group there are, effectively, only two of us doing anything.  Working groups, should be that, not just meetings where we discuss and others ‘do’.     However, there will always be people to want to make a difference and do put their time into making a change.  Equally there will be people who can network locally which is just as important.

My talks are becoming slightly more hard hitting, so that I am prepared to say that I am still waiting to meet more people like myself in my area.  Where are the people living with dementia I ask?  Why am I the only person able to speak at these events.  Reaching people in your own community living with dementia is not easy when you have no provision in place to sign post after diagnosis to support that does not yet exist.

My area with the aid of the Alzheimer’s Society have made wonderful strides towards looking at how we can be more inclusive to all.  There are a core of people that I meet at these events who are fabulous and work extremely hard at promoting change.   What I would now like to see is the general public supporting us.   I am touched when people come to speak to me at events telling me how brave I am to speak out, but I don’t feel brave, I am not brave.  I just have a desire to make things better for myself, and for the other people living with dementia in my area.  I just want to be able to have the choice of different groups I can attend or get involved with.  I don’t want to be sitting at home whilst my Alzheimer’s progresses and have no art group to go to, or anything similar.

When I am at home I am scared.  I feel dread at having to think and write a talk for the next event.  Maybe this is my dementia making me shrink back in stepping forward.  Part of me longs for someone else to take over but then I know I will never be able to step back and not get involved.   There is a wonderful core of people who are working hard, but I want to be a voice for dementia because I live with it, they don’t.

It is hard work for me to do these things on my own at home, the will is there but I have to admit to struggling to follow through sometimes.  I am finding that I can no longer organise things that need to be done ‘just like that’.

Days when my Fibromyalgia is flaring and I am wracked with pain making it harder, and now it is possible that I also have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome which is pants quite frankly!  I have to pace myself so that I can do one major thing per week with the Alzheimer’s Society, attend Art Group, my Knit n Natter group, then sleep the rest of the week.

I find it harder to get things sorted out at home these days, the small damp patch that needs doing before the walls can be painted, and the skimming of the ceiling too.    I need to find someone to help me dig the garden over, re-fence…….   Why can’t I just do these things?  I don’t know why, all I know is that I feel scared to do any of it.  It doesn’t make sense.  Once I have forced myself to do it I am relieved.  It almost feels phobic.   How I wish I had someone who could actually sit and do these things for me, or with me.  I am understanding that it may be time to de-clutter massively ready for when I progress.  Time to get a cleaner to help me keep my home clean and tidy.

In the meantime I will continue amidst the constant exhaustion, to give a voice for dementia when I can.26992176_1933561930010577_3170965173589389220_n

 

 

 

 

 

Dementia: a disability?

I have recently seen a question that asks if you consider yourself being disabled living with dementia.   I think this is a really interesting question.

One of the meanings as in the English Oxford dictionary is:

Disabled:  1(of a person) having a physical or mental condition that limits their movements, senses, or activitieshashtag person not disability

Do I consider myself having a disability?  Yes I do have a disability because I am now limited but not restricted in what I do.  But the whole question of whether living with dementia is a disability is another question all together.  Some would argue no, because it is a life limiting disease not a lifelong disease, but even that argument does not stand up, because there are other diseases such as MS (Multiple Sclerosis), or Anxiety and Depression that can be equally life limiting.

I think the difficulties lay with getting a diagnosis in the first place.  Do you have a disability only when you have a diagnosis?   It would seem so.  Which brings me back to Dementia.  Speaking for myself, I consider it to be a disability because I can no longer carry out my everyday life in the way I used to, mainly because my mental capacity to organise things is diminishing.   Physically my body is not working like it should either as the signals and messages from my brain are getting more foggy.   Mentally, I can go into a ‘meltdown’ where I need to shut down in peace and quiet, alone, when things get too much to process.   So yes, I would consider myself to have a disability.

 

As I have said before I have two disabilities, but Dementia can mean the other is overlooked.  Fibromyalgia for me means living with constant pain restricting my physical abilities.  During a ‘flare up’  the pain and exhaustion is so intense throughout my body that I do very little other than sleep.  Fibro ‘fog’ melds with dementia to shut me down for a week or however long it is.   However, I may not tell anyone around me that I am in more pain than usual because I live with it dailyinvisible_disability_stickers-r449f8209b2e24f9e99cbbfda6d03ece2_v9i40_8byvr_324

Does this stop me doing things?   It slows me down certainly, but you can adjust your life to cope with it as much as you can.  Disability is a noun and identifies what hinders me, but does not stop me.

Disability is a word to bear in mind only, for each and every person has their own abilities or disabilities.

As per usual, these are my views alone and are not necessarily definitive information.

Diary thoughts with dementia

Sometime life feels like it’s in limbo.  Waiting for something.  Thinking I should always be active and not sitting alone quietly sewing or enjoying a film on TV.   Waiting for time..to what..pass?  I don’t know, maybe this is just how dementia feels like?    Does it feel unhappy?  Nope.  It just is how it is.

Sometimes when I have a diary full of meetings, and events, I just roll with whatever that day brings without feeling I have had any input into organising it but have simply turned up and been a small part of it.    A big hand that fills my diary and hands it back to me smiling.  “This.  This is how you will fill your time in a pleasant and meaningful manner“.  I smile as I take the diary and look with curiosity to see what pleasures I have for the coming week.

Then there is the ‘To Do’ lists I have written down on the righthand page of my Moleskine Diary.   This, however, gives me a hidden creeping fear, no not fear; anxiety, yes that’s it. Anxiety.  I have agreed to do this thing, and now I am scared that I cannot carry it out or finish it, or even start it.  Always in my head ‘I can do that’ , until the time comes to start it and then the dementia reality sets in.  The hesitation of indecision, the confusion of my own instructions where everything falls apart.  Followed by the quiet talking to myself – “I can do this, step by step.  Don’t overthink it“.  Then I when I finally start I am more confident to say whether I can do it, or whether to say I tried but it is now beyond my capabilities.   Admitting when you can no longer do things can free you up to do more of the things that you CAN do.

So, in reality I have a mixture of a Diary life, and my chill out self preservation life.  I attend meetings, give talks about my dementia, am part of a group working towards making my local town dementia friendly.  Then I have my withdrawal from the world life where I stay at home, alone, enjoying my own company, doing a bit of housework, and a bit of craftwork.  But, I also have my craft workshops for dementia in my diary that I attend and love because it gives me inspiration, gives me a place to be with other inspiring people living with dementia.