Media, I am not a dementia soundbite!

I have had two radio interviews, one with BBC Radio Tyne Tees, which I have written about, and another with BBC Radio Newcastle.  When I talk I sound fine.  People say to me that I don’t sound like there is anything wrong with me.  Exactly, and I am the first person to point that out with, I might sound okay, I might look okay, but I am not okay.  So, when I talked to these presenters I say this to them.   They ask me questions and I answer,  I tell them how it is for me, because everyone who lives with dementia experiences it differently.  I do however, talk about general things that people with dementia can experience when living with the disease.  But, they are asking me about myself so I answer.

I felt the interviews went reasonably well, apart from Tyne Tees chap who kept using the word ‘suffering’ grrrr!   He actually had no idea he was continually saying it, which means he was just doing a job and not at all interested.

When I listen to them back I am horrified by how they have been edited.  I sound like someone with more advanced dementia!!!!   The answers have been cut so that what is left are the words I am saying inbetween the answers I have given…just words, going nowhere in particular.

Why do reporters do this, why should I be shown as a media stereotypical dementia soundbite?   I AM NOT A SOUNDBITE JUST SO YOU CAN TICK A BOX TO SAY YOU HAVE INTERVIEWED SOMEONE WITH DEMENTIA.

Why can’t the media accept that more people are being diagnosed with dementia earlier at a younger age, and can still hold a sensible conversation.  

I need to have a cup of tea to calm down now 🙂

Confusion, viruses, overmedicating with Dementia

I was poorly earlier this week.  Monday morning and I woke feeling okay but it went down hill from there on.

61w3maLkAxL._AC_UL200_SR200,200_I went to take my medication and hesitated, the compartment for Monday morning was empty… had I already taken them?  I felt so confused.  I had a vague memory of thinking that I could take my Monday mornings medication from the original packs, or did I?  Why would I do that?  What reason would I have for doing that?  I couldn’t think what to do but decided that I had left out my original medication boxes for a reason and took my usual dose.   It is hard for anyone to understand how you can get so confused at either sorting out your medication or taking it, but when you have dementia confusion is all so real.   When you come across so normal to most people and look like you are in control of everything, conveying that you easily get confused is difficult for most people to believe.  But, on Monday I was confused.

Then I started to feel very sick , started vomiting and continued to do so most of the day.  My daughter arrived at lunchtime and called 111.  There is a stomach virus doing the rounds so I may just have been unlucky.  But, one of my tablets is for newly diagnosed overactive thyroid so doubling up on that didn’t help.  I was feeling too poorly to say I may have doubled up on my medication.   It probably was the virus but certainly wasn’t helped by taking too much of my medication.

I took advice the next day from a pharmacist and then my GP, and have sorted out Weekly Pill  packs for the future.

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This is a Nomad pack. Pre packed medication by the pharmacist

Never underestimate the possibility of someone living with dementia to be confused however well they live.  So, it helps to plan and put solutions in place to continue to live well without stress.   Most people already know about these weekly pill packs, but may not necessarily feel that they need to use them yet.  From my own experience, I am certainly going to feel more confident using them so that my occasional confusion won’t cause me to overdose on my medication in future.

 

 

I became a Dementia Friends Champion

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Last week I attended a session to become a Dementia Friends Champion.  I guess there were around 15 of us from all walks of life and jobs but I was the only person living with Dementia.  Obviously when I go places it is not something I announce to the world and his wife, why would I?

Why was I there?   I’ve already accompanied others when they have delivered Dementia Friends Sessions to both adults and children in local schools as part of working towards becoming a Dementia Friendly Community, with the steering group Dementia Friendly Seaham.  So it seemed natural that I could start delivering them myself at some point.  Becoming a Dementia Champion you start by committing to delivering one session in the first four months, and that can be to just one person (family and friends) or to a group of people (etc workplace).

Getting back to the information day.  I am not sure how I felt at first, listening to the facilitator talk about ‘people living with dementia‘, as it felt like he wasn’t talking about me.  It is a very strange place to be, listening and ‘learning’ to read a script educating others about dementia.  I somehow felt detached emotionally from the whole event, even though inside I kept thinking “this is about me”.

The script is necessary because it is about facts, and gives standard information that is not  personal but really informative.  Every dementia friends session given around the country will be the same.  This is how information works best and Dementia Friends Sessions are so, so important to educate as many people as possible about how, individually, they can make a difference.   It is as simple as being aware of how a person living with dementia can see the world around them.  Example – Black door mats = holes in the floor, or difficulty counting money at a supermarket checkout slowing everyone up.   Those are just a couple of small examples.  For me the real bonus is about people just learning to have a bit of understanding about the many difficulties of living with dementia.

So, here I am in this Dementia Champion Session feeling somewhat disconnected from everyone around me, obviously this was just a person introspection of mine and not in anyway about the people I was with.   I think that sometimes I just wish I was one of those people learning about dementia and not living it.

Anyway, it was a good day and I came away with the confidence that I could do this, I also caught up with people I had met before with was lovely.

I am looking forward to delivering my first Dementia Friends Session following the script, and possibly at the end when I finally ask the people attending ‘what someone who is living with dementia looks like?’  I will say “me“.

Staying proactive when all you want to do is sleep!

I have been busily trying to put together some pieces for a Dementia Friends working session I am doing with Rowena from the Alzheimer’s Society on Monday.  This is with Social Worker students at Durham University.

I always enjoy these Dementia working sessions as it gives me a voice and hopefully I can help towards making a difference for people living with Dementia if it gives a better understanding.

However, for the past few months I have felt so exhausted all the time and it has got to the stage where I am sometimes too exhausted to even shower in the mornings and when I do I have to rest afterwords.  I have Fibromyalgia so am already in constant pain, 24 hours a day 7 days a week…  and as I have previously said I don’t take any medication because of the side effects all of the medication.  At present I spend a lot of my days sleeping which is a tad non productive personally, but I just can’t stay awake!extreme-fatigue-contentPreviously putting together a talk about dementia for me has been relatively easy, because once I start writing I can’t stop as my head can go at a hundred miles per hour,  but lately the physical and mental effort of trying to think is so draining I am really struggling.  I don’t want this to be the end of my work, but I think I will have to reassess what I am able to do for the foreseeable future which is gutting.

So today I need to finish off what I have put together so far for one talk, and re-vamp another already written to suit.  I am not sure that I will be able to fill all the time allotted to me but will have to be content that I have done my best and not feel that I am letting anyone down too much.

Will let you know how how it goes.    Also Doctors on Wednesday for the results of a blood test, but have been told to look up Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and see if my symptoms match.   What can I say, sometimes life kicks you when you’re down and you just have to find a way round to get up again.

Thanks for reading  🙂

 

Dementia: a disability?

I have recently seen a question that asks if you consider yourself being disabled living with dementia.   I think this is a really interesting question.

One of the meanings as in the English Oxford dictionary is:

Disabled:  1(of a person) having a physical or mental condition that limits their movements, senses, or activitieshashtag person not disability

Do I consider myself having a disability?  Yes I do have a disability because I am now limited but not restricted in what I do.  But the whole question of whether living with dementia is a disability is another question all together.  Some would argue no, because it is a life limiting disease not a lifelong disease, but even that argument does not stand up, because there are other diseases such as MS (Multiple Sclerosis), or Anxiety and Depression that can be equally life limiting.

I think the difficulties lay with getting a diagnosis in the first place.  Do you have a disability only when you have a diagnosis?   It would seem so.  Which brings me back to Dementia.  Speaking for myself, I consider it to be a disability because I can no longer carry out my everyday life in the way I used to, mainly because my mental capacity to organise things is diminishing.   Physically my body is not working like it should either as the signals and messages from my brain are getting more foggy.   Mentally, I can go into a ‘meltdown’ where I need to shut down in peace and quiet, alone, when things get too much to process.   So yes, I would consider myself to have a disability.

 

As I have said before I have two disabilities, but Dementia can mean the other is overlooked.  Fibromyalgia for me means living with constant pain restricting my physical abilities.  During a ‘flare up’  the pain and exhaustion is so intense throughout my body that I do very little other than sleep.  Fibro ‘fog’ melds with dementia to shut me down for a week or however long it is.   However, I may not tell anyone around me that I am in more pain than usual because I live with it dailyinvisible_disability_stickers-r449f8209b2e24f9e99cbbfda6d03ece2_v9i40_8byvr_324

Does this stop me doing things?   It slows me down certainly, but you can adjust your life to cope with it as much as you can.  Disability is a noun and identifies what hinders me, but does not stop me.

Disability is a word to bear in mind only, for each and every person has their own abilities or disabilities.

As per usual, these are my views alone and are not necessarily definitive information.

Crash…

That’s what I am talking about.  Last night the pain started.spikes1There is no position to sit with my legs to stop the pain, the burning of my knees, the deep screaming pain creeping with long spiky fingers along my leg muscles, shoulders, arms, wrists…..

And crash….the intense exhaustion that pushes me down.  Fibromyalgia.  I can never forget that I have it, but I do ignore it on the whole.   When the flare up comes and crashes me down there is no ignoring the invasion of torture surging around my body.   Blooming dramatic eh!   Anybody with Fibro or CFS or ME with tell you there is no drama about it, it’s ridiculously real.  Fibro Fog, heard of it?  Same with CFS – the foggy confusion turning your brain thoughts into a mush.   Well Mr. Nasty Fibro, Ive got Alzheimer’s you can’t get one over on me!   I have strategies, and things in place for the likes of you.

Living with dementia and coping with another disability is all about managing it.   I don’t take any medication for my Fibromyalgia.  Yes, that’s right, zilch, nada, none.    I have tried the usual Amytriptaline, Pregabalin and codeine etc, but each one has side effects.  I have already talked about this before but it doesn’t hurt to go over it.

Anything that makes my dementia ‘worse’, such as the dullness of thought, confusion, woolly headedness is not something I want to mess about with.   The medication for Fibro ‘wiped’ me out and I could not function.  Of course I know that with time they can get better, but I don’t want to risk losing any function for however length of time.  This is my choice.   I once had an intravenous infusion of Lidocaine and Oh my word it was the best thing ever.  ALL PAIN GONE after a few days.  I could walk more, I had energy, I could be NORMAL.   It lasted just under 5 weeks and then C R A S H  the pain returned.  Not just returned but with avengance.

To maintain this pain free normal life existence I would have to receive this infusion once every 4-5 weeks at hospital during over a couple of hours.  Not just me.  It doesn’t work for everyone but it did for me.  The sad part is that it is not available because of funding, I was lucky to have that one time funded.    One thing that came out of it was that I realised that without taking medication, my pain is maintained on a relatively even keel.  I have flare ups, like now, but they are never as bad as I hear some people because I live with the same amount of pain all the time.  No real relief but no mega crashes either.  I just have my normal bad crashes which I have learnt to manage.

As with my dementia I do what I can when I can, and when I can’t I rest.  I will cancel things if necessary and just stay at home, gently walking about when I can, sleeping a lot, and taking care of myself.   I will sit and sew if my wrists will allow me to, or ‘sleep’ through films on tv.dtcokxbxcaemejt

Having dementia and a co morbidity is just a case of looking how to manage both, in a relaxed and mentally chilled way, accepting what you can do, when you can do it, and riding the storm!

As always these are just my thoughts and opinions for what its worth 🙂

 

 

Diary thoughts with dementia

Sometime life feels like it’s in limbo.  Waiting for something.  Thinking I should always be active and not sitting alone quietly sewing or enjoying a film on TV.   Waiting for time..to what..pass?  I don’t know, maybe this is just how dementia feels like?    Does it feel unhappy?  Nope.  It just is how it is.

Sometimes when I have a diary full of meetings, and events, I just roll with whatever that day brings without feeling I have had any input into organising it but have simply turned up and been a small part of it.    A big hand that fills my diary and hands it back to me smiling.  “This.  This is how you will fill your time in a pleasant and meaningful manner“.  I smile as I take the diary and look with curiosity to see what pleasures I have for the coming week.

Then there is the ‘To Do’ lists I have written down on the righthand page of my Moleskine Diary.   This, however, gives me a hidden creeping fear, no not fear; anxiety, yes that’s it. Anxiety.  I have agreed to do this thing, and now I am scared that I cannot carry it out or finish it, or even start it.  Always in my head ‘I can do that’ , until the time comes to start it and then the dementia reality sets in.  The hesitation of indecision, the confusion of my own instructions where everything falls apart.  Followed by the quiet talking to myself – “I can do this, step by step.  Don’t overthink it“.  Then I when I finally start I am more confident to say whether I can do it, or whether to say I tried but it is now beyond my capabilities.   Admitting when you can no longer do things can free you up to do more of the things that you CAN do.

So, in reality I have a mixture of a Diary life, and my chill out self preservation life.  I attend meetings, give talks about my dementia, am part of a group working towards making my local town dementia friendly.  Then I have my withdrawal from the world life where I stay at home, alone, enjoying my own company, doing a bit of housework, and a bit of craftwork.  But, I also have my craft workshops for dementia in my diary that I attend and love because it gives me inspiration, gives me a place to be with other inspiring people living with dementia.